🐾 Link for the livestream of our lovely Seniors graduating is right here for you to watch them walk the stage. We are so proud of you Bulldogs! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oa2mX8iN6ho 🐾 Class of 2022 Seniors! Make sure to be at Osceola Heritage Park tomorrow by 8:00 AM sharp! Do not be late because there will be heavy traffic. Remember to leave EVERYTHING in the car. No cell phones! Don't forget about the dress code and we will see you tomorrow morning! Go Bulldogs! 🐾 Reminder, tomorrow is a early-release day! 🐾 Attention Class of 2023, make sure to schedule your senior session today at cady.com/schedule to take your yearbook photo. Don't be left out of your senior yearbook! 🐾 Yearbooks have arrived! If you are on campus, you can receive your book from 3-313 and if you are DE, you can pick your book up from the front office. Please have an ID to show when you come to pick it up! 🐾
October 2021
's Top Story

We Will Never Forget

SCHS' Bulldog Battalion Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of 9/11

by
Noah Jenkins
October 2021
's Top Story

We Will Never Forget

SCHS' Bulldog Battalion Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of 9/11

by
Noah Jenkins
SCHS Army JROTC cadets prepare to raise the American flag while fellow cadets salute in remembrance of the 9/11 attacks (Noah Jenkins/The Cloud)
SCHS Army JROTC cadets prepare to raise the American flag while fellow cadets salute in remembrance of the 9/11 attacks (Noah Jenkins/The Cloud)

For every current Saint Cloud High student, a world without the September 11th attacks as never existed. We have only known a world with a War on Terror—and the fear of terror alongside it. We have only known a world where air travel is a long, drawn out process involving the TSA. For us it is hard to imagine anything else, nonetheless imagine the anguish the Americans who remember that day experienced.

Colonel Thomas Donnelly, JROTC instructor, speaks to students and staff in the courtyard about the significance of the 20th anniversary of 9/11 (Noah Jenkins/The Cloud)

Many stories of 9/11 follow the same pattern. It was a normal day with scheduled meetings, school, or planned celebrations even that was brought to a screeching halt once the gravity of the situation was realized. The whole country, for the first time in that way, stopped and united together against something we all could identify as evil. And this is not even to mention those at Ground Zero or their families. The trauma and heartache they must have experienced is something none of us will ever understand.

With all this in mind, Saint Cloud High's Army JROTC battalion deemed it fitting to reflect on such a pivotal moment in our nation's history. On Friday, September 10, 2021, one day before the twentieth anniversary of the attacks, the courtyard, usually bustling with students during lunchtime, went still and quiet. With everyone gathered around, brigades of cadets solemnly marched around the flagpole which, at this point, had its flag lowered by another set of cadets.

The American flag rests at half staff in remembrance of the 9/11 attacks (Noah Jenkins/The Cloud)

All attention was now pointed at the American flag ready to be raised when Colonel Thomas Donnelly, JROTC instructor, began talking about the great significance the anniversary held and great importance of instances of remembrance like this one. It was a needed reminder given, as stated earlier, the only people on campus who have memory of the event are faculty and staff.

After the speech, cadets raised the American flag to full staff before resting it at half staff—a sign of America's resilience but also one of an everlasting sorrow. The battalion responded with a salute, the ultimate sign of honor and respect. Members of Saint Cloud High's choir followed this up with patriotic songs, including a solo by Cadet First Lieutenant Madeline P. Despite having little to no connection to that fateful day, the passion they displayed in their voices would not lead one to this conclusion.

By the conclusion of the ceremony, a palatable change in the atmosphere in the courtyard could be sensed even as the area slowly returned to its usual level of liveliness. This sense, even among those who could easily disregard the day as a relic of the past, truly is an encouraging sign that we will never forget.